The Poppy Family – “Where Evil Grows” (1971)

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It should be no secret around these parts that we enjoy a bit of evil in our music. And, well, back in the early ’70s, Canadian Vancouver-based bubblegum pop band The Poppy Family released a little number on their sophomore LP Poppy Seeds (1971) titled “Where Evil Grows” that just might top our list of faves. Having been described by critic Kim Cooper as “The Partridge Family + The Manson Family = The Poppy Family,” it’s clear from the band’s lyrics that among its principle members, married couple Terry and Susan Jacks, there existed a peculiar and twisted dark side that echoed the end of the flowery ’60s.

Take the debut album track, “There’s No Blood in Bone,” where Susan hauntingly recites “Marie now walks, her life is sleep, she never looks above her feet, she never smiles nor does she speak.” Or, perhaps their excellent cover of Jody Reynolds’ dark classic “Endless Sleep.” But, as good as both of those tracks are, nothing comes close to what is probably the finest dark bubblegum song ever recorded, “Where Evil Grows.” Take it with you on a late night drive in the woods and you’ll know where we’re coming from.

Following the release of their sophomore album in ’71, the couple divorced and Terry went on to record the unforgivable “Seasons in the Sun” and subsequently confirm all speculation of evil.

The Poppy Family – “Where Evil Grows”

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The Beacon Street Union – ‘The Eyes of the Beacon Street Union’ (1968)

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Named after a street in their hometown of Boston, The Beacon Street Union was a 60s psych group that existed around the same time as the other “Bosstown” sound groups like Ultimate Spinach and Orpheus. Formed in 1966, the group went on to record two albums, The Eye of the Beacon Street Union and The Clown Died in Marvin Gardens, but split shortly after due to the lack of attention the albums received. Following the band’s dissolution, three of the members went on to record a further album as Eagle, while a fourth became a country singer in the Sour Mash Boys. Several readers have asked me about these guys since I included one of their tracks on this month’s DGP Mix, so here’s a couple more for those of you who were inquiring.

The Beacon Street Union – “Mystic Mourning”

The Beacon Street Union – “Four Hundred and Five”